Wednesday, 22 May 2019

HOW HAN CHINESE RATS ARE HAVING THEIR VITAL JUICES SUCKED OUT OF THEIR VILE EVIL BODIES!



Henny Sender in Hong Kong YESTERDAY

A beefed-up US regime for vetting investments from China has ensnared one of China’s leading health tech companies, forcing it to divest from two of the US companies it bought, according to executives and lawyers. The headwinds the Chinese company, iCarbonX, faces reveal the broadening scope of Washington’s attempts to unpick technology linkages to China — a drive that is sending a chill through Silicon Valley and China’s own booming tech sector. The Committee of Foreign Investment in the United States, a US agency that has the power to order divestments of deals already done, told iCarbonX to back out of its investments in PatientsLikeMe and HealthTell, two US healthcare companies, long after the deals closed, according to people involved. Cfius declines to comment on individual cases. The forced exits are a blow to the Chinese company, which is backed by Tencent founder Pony Ma, who valued it at $1bn from the time it was established in 2015. iCarbonX is led by Wang Jun, a leading genomicist and co-founder of the Beijing Genome Institute. Mr Wang is seeking to make his company a world leader in the field of predicting illnesses, using genetic data to help people anticipate what medical conditions they could fall victim to on the basis of genetic and lifestyle factors. One of his main initiatives was the creation of a Digital Life Alliance, in which seven companies backed by Mr Wang — most located in the US — were to work together. But that ambition has been disrupted by the forced divestments from alliance members PatientsLikeMe and HealthTell. iCarbonX had invested nearly $400m in the members of the alliance, which also includes SomaLogic, AoBiome, GALT, Imagu and Robustnique. PatientsLikeMe is a website on which almost 1m people share their experiences of achieving resilience in fighting diseases such as cancer. HealthTell helps patients know how their immune system reacts to various medical, behavioural and environmental factors. So far, at least, a third company, Colorado-based SomaLogic, which among other things measures changes in the body’s proteins, has avoided a thumbs-down from Cfius. “Our relationship with iCarbonX does not give them access to SomaLogic’s technical secrets, proteomic data or patient data,” it said. “Around the time of the iCarbonX investment, there were discussions about a potential joint venture related to putting SomaLogic’s proteomics technology in China, but SomaLogic and iCarbonX were unable to reach agreement and those discussions were terminated.” Cfius gained new powers in August under the Foreign Investment Risk Review Modernisation Act, which allows the body to block Chinese investments that might give them access to US tech companies’ business information and other key data. Since then, the number of proposed Chinese acquisitions of US companies that have been blocked or withdrawn has risen sharply and, according to consultancy Rhodium Group, $20bn in divestitures are under way. “Sellers don’t want Chinese buyers,” said one Washington-based lawyer. “Since August there has been a noticeable drop-off in China work. [The government] is using national security as the pretext for other goals.” The lack of enthusiasm is not one-sided, though. “Cfius has had a chilling effect,” said Christian Davis, a specialist in Cfius matters for Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld, a law firm in Washington. “But at the same time, Chinese policy also discourages flows to the US.”

ANOTHER NAIL IN THE COFFIN OF THE HAN CHINESE MONSTERS

WEELLL! It seems as if Huawei is going the way of the dodo! Not a minute goes by now without a fresh story of how all doors are shutting close smack in the face of the Huawei FILTHY MURDEROUS HAN CHINESE MONSTERS! We shall have NO PEACE until we see them all DEAD - and then sit on their graves to ensure they don't come back!

This story just out from the Financial Times.

Huawei’s plans to ramp up production of its own silicon chips have been derailed after the UK chip designer Arm said it would stop licensing its essential technology to the Chinese company. The Cambridge-based company, which is owned by Japan’s SoftBank, said it was forced to cease sharing its technology with Huawei to comply with a US banning order, issued last week. The step is a big setback for the Chinese telecoms equipment maker which was dealt a series of blows on Tuesday when four large mobile operators in Japan and the UK pulled planned launches of new Huawei smartphones due to the US banning order. While Arm is not a US company, its designs include intellectual property from a number of US companies that it has bought, including the $931m purchase in 2004 of Artisan, a US chip company. Arm said its designs contained “US origin technology”, making them subject to the export controls. Huawei had planned to increase production of its own chips after the news of the ban, which has cut it off from microprocessors made by Qualcomm and Intel, among others. Huawei’s chip design unit HiSilicon employs 7,000 people and has produced a range of smartphone chips, many of which are manufactured by TSMC in Taiwan. But these designs rely heavily on Arm’s technology. “There really isn’t anybody out there who does what Arm does. The time to create a working processor from scratch, particularly of the complexity of Arm processors, is measured in years and hundreds of millions of dollars,” said Scott Hover-Smoot, general counsel at chipmaker Graphcore, who has worked in the semiconductor industry for the past 25 years, including at TSMC. “For Huawei to come up with an alternative is not going to be cheap, easy or fast. But they have known for two or three years they’ve been under investigation by the US government and these are some of the brightest people in the world. I’m confident they have a plan B in place,” he added. In February, Arm’s chief executive, Simon Segars, defended his company’s work with Huawei, telling reporters that Huawei’s chip designs had become “very sophisticated” and that its design team was now “world class.” “Our relationship there is with the chip design team at Huawei. We’ve had a relationship with them for a long time, been producing chips for their handsets and been innovating quite strongly,” he said. “Obviously we are subject to any export control either from the UK . . . the US . . . but right now we are continuing to work with HiSilicon.” Recommended Huawei Technologies Co Ltd EE and Vodafone pull Huawei phones from UK 5G launch Huawei confirmed it had been informed over the weekend that Arm would stop doing business with it. The company’s Kirin 980 chipset is built on Arm designs but will not be affected for about a year, it estimated. This month, the Financial Times reported that Huawei was building a 400-person chip research and development factory outside Cambridge, just a 15-minute drive from the headquarters of Arm Holdings. The two companies were reported to be working closely on innovation. A Huawei spokesperson said: “We value our close relationships with our partners, but recognise the pressure some of them are under as a result of politically motivated decisions. We are confident this regrettable situation can be resolved and our priority remains to continue to deliver world-class technology and products to our customers around the world.”

THE PIG IS PANICKING! KILL XI JIN PIG!

This just in from The New York Times: “Start from the beginning!” HAN CHINESE RATS BACK TO THE MISERY OF MAO’S LONG MARCH! HAHAHAHA!

BEIJING — President Xi Jinping of China called for the Chinese people to “start again” and begin a modern “long march,” invoking a turning point in Communist Party history as the country braces for a protracted trade war with the United States.
“Now there is a new long march, and we should make a new start,” Mr. Xi told a cheering crowd Monday in Jiangxi Province as he started a domestic tour that is seen as an attempt to rally the nation as trade tensions with the United States escalate.
Mr. Xi was accompanied by his top trade negotiator, Liu He, as he made the remarks at the historic site of the start of Mao Zedong’s Long March of 1934. The Long March was a 4,000-mile journey that took more than a year and would ultimately lead to the ousting 15 years later of the Nationalists by Mao and the Communists.
While Mr. Xi did not mention the trade war in his comments, they are the strongest signal yet that Beijing has abandoned hopes of a deal with the United States on the issue in the near term. Prospects of a deal faded earlier this month when talks broke down between negotiators for the two sides and President Trump accused China of breaking terms that had already been settled.

Tuesday, 21 May 2019

THE EVIL HAN CHINESE EMPIRE IS DISINTEGRATING!

WELL, BROTHERS AND SISTERS AND FRIENDS....WE CAN HARDLY CONTAIN OUR JOY, EXULTATION, ECSTASY FROM SEEING JUST HOW RAPIDLY THE EVIL CHINESE EMPIRE IS HURTLING DOWN THE ROAD TO PERDITION AND OBLIVION! NOT A MOMENT TOO SOON, YET FAST ENOUGH TO BE BEYOND OUR WILDEST DREAMS!

YES! THE EVIL HAN CHINESE EMPIRE IS BEGINNING TO UNRAVEL! NO-ONE OTHER THAN THE MONSTER RAT-IN-CHIEF (XIer EVIL PERSONIFIED JIN PIG - MAY HE DIE WITH THE DISEASE!) HAS JUST COME OUT - REPORTED IN THE NEW YORK TIMES - EXHORTING HIS FELLOW HAN CHINESE MURDEROUS GENOCIDAL RATS "TO START BACK FROM THE BEGINNING!"

CAN YOU BELIEVE OUR GOOD FORTUNE? WITH THE HELP OF ANY GOD AND WITH OUR FAITH IN FREEDOM, BEFORE LONG WE SHALL BE RID OF THIS PARASITIC NEFARIOUS EVIL HAN CHINESE EMPIRE! CELEBRATE, FRIENDS - BUT REMEMBER! KEEP UP THE FIGHT! MAINTAIN YOUR RAGE! FREE HUMANITY FROM THE CANCER OF THE HAN CHINESE EMPIRE!

Incidentally, do not miss our next instalment of "The Concept of Freedom" titled "Freedom and Faith" coming up in the next few hours. Thank you all once more for your heart-warming support!

KILL AND DESTROY ALL HAN CHINESE RATS!

From the Financial Times:

Chinese equities eased on Wednesday as investors sold technology stocks on reports that China’s Hikvision may be included in a US blacklist, building on restrictions issued against Huawei last week.  China’s CSI 300 index of Shanghai and Shenzhen-listed stocks was down 0.1 per cent in morning trading, paring sharper losses of from earlier in the session. The Shenzhen-listed shares of Hikvision fell as much as 10 per cent in morning trading after the New York Times reported that the US would add the surveillance company to a trade blacklist. The stock later trimmed losses to be down 4.6 per cent. Zhejiang Dahua Technology, which was also reported to be at risk of a ban, fell 5.9 per cent.

VICTORY! FREEDOM FOR OUR HONG KONG HEROES!


This story just in from the Financial Times

Two Hong Kong activists who sought political asylum say they have been granted refugee status by Germany in what is believed to be the first time dissenters from the territory have been given the status by a foreign country. The move by Germany, if true, underlines growing international concerns over erosions of rule of law and freedom of speech in Hong Kong, despite guarantees these liberties would be respected when the territory was handed over to China in 1997. The German consulate in Hong Kong did not respond to requests for comment on the development. Concerns about rule of law in the territory have been exacerbated by the Hong Kong government’s plan to fast-track a legal amendment enabling the extradition of criminal suspects to mainland China, a move that has drawn fierce domestic and international opposition. “No one likes to leave the place where you grow up, it is a big price for me to pay,” said one of the activists, Ray Wong Toi-yeung, in an exclusive interview with the FT. He said he wept one day while on the street in Germany because he missed his own culture and home so much. Mr Wong, 25, and his fellow activist Alan Li Tung-sing, 27, are leading members of Hong Kong Indigenous, a radical group that fought for Hong Kong independence. The two were charged with rioting offences for their part in civil unrest in 2016 in the main shopping district of the former British colony. They fled Hong Kong to Germany in November 2017 while on bail and were listed as wanted in the territory. A co-activist from the same group, Edward Leung, who stayed in Hong Kong, was last year sentenced to six years in jail on similar charges. The Hong Kong government forwarded inquiries about the activists’ asylum bid to the Hong Kong police, which declined to comment on the specific case, saying legal proceedings were under way. “In general, the police will, according to the circumstances of the case, track down the whereabouts of the suspects and arrest them by all possible means,” said a police spokesman. Hong Kong pro-independence posters adorn a campus "democracy wall" at Chinese University of Hong Kong. © EPA Mr Wong and Mr Li have stayed in three different refugee camps in Germany while awaiting the approval of their application for asylum. They were given refugee status one year ago but only chose to reveal this now to raise awareness of Hong Kong’s extradition amendment and the 30th anniversary of China’s Tiananmen Square massacre on June 4. “It is important have someone outside [out of prison] to tell the world what’s happening in Hong Kong,” Mr Wong said. “I will never be able to come back if Hong Kong can extradite me back to China once I return,” he said. “It is important for me to speak up as one of the first political refugees of Hong Kong.” Mr Wong said the German government did not give a specific reason for granting them refugee status. But he said he had told German government officials during interviews that he believed his charges in Hong Kong were politically motivated. He chose to go to Germany because he believed “Germany has a much stronger stance towards China, especially in terms of human rights”. He said he was learning German at the University of Göttingen and would start a politics and philosophy degree in September. Patrick Poon, a Hong Kong-based researcher for Amnesty International, said the granting of asylum to the pair was “a very clear message” that the human rights situation in Hong Kong was deteriorating. He said he was concerned that Hong Kong’s treatment of human rights was now on par with China or other countries with poor track records in the area. Eleven international parliamentarians from countries including Germany, Canada, Malaysia, the UK, Myanmar and The Philippines, including those from Germany’s Greens and Christian Democratic Union parties, said in a statement that Mr Leung had “been a victim of” the Hong Kong government’s “abuse of the judicial system to imprison political opponents”. Another Hong Konger, Lee Sin-yi, who is facing a similar rioting charge, is on the run in Taiwan. “More Hong Kongers will go into exile,” she said in a recording broadcast earlier this month by a pro-Taiwan independence group. The two men said they expected to speak at a seminar in the German parliament to mark the June 4 massacre.

HAN CHINESE RATS ARE DYING - Why don't we hasten the process?

Why has China grown so fast? One very important reason is that it timed its economic opening to the world exceptionally well.
The three decades following China’s 1978 “reform and opening” coincided with a massive surge in China’s working-age population, which peaked at more than one billion in 2013—more than three times the size of the entire U.S. at the time. Connecting that gargantuan pool of youthful strivers to global supply chains not only enabled Chinese factories to undercut other low-value-added manufacturers world-wide but also helped build a deep pool of savings to finance investment. Young workers with rapidly rising incomes, eyeing an uncertain future, saved heavily. That capital was then recycled into more factories and world-class infrastructure, further boosting China’s comparative advantage.

SECOND IN A SERIES

This series asks what may well be the most important economic question of our time. China stands at a crossroads, approaching income levels at which most countries experience a sharp growth slowdown as they can no longer rely on cheap labor. It may struggle to innovate without strong intellectual-property protection and a more efficient way of financing companies. The ball is in Beijing’s court.
All of this, however, is now moving into reverse.
China already has about 10 million fewer people between the ages of 15 and 64 than in 2013 and by 2035 it will have about 80 million fewer, according to United Nations’ projections. China’s sky-high savings rate also has been falling since 2010—the same year that working-age citizens peaked as a percentage of the total population. Factors other than demographics also are at play: Export growth has weakened since the financial crisis, weighing on corporate savings. But savings growth will likely slow further. To maintain high economic growth, China will need to import a lot more capital from the rest of the world, or use its own capital much more efficiently, or both. All of this is happening a lot faster than many appreciate.
Trickle DownChinese data, change from a year earlierSource: CEIC*Between 15 and 64 years of age
%Real GDPWorking agepopulation*Urban population1980’85’90’952000’05’10’15-20246810121416
China isn’t the only one with a demographic problem. The number of babies born in the U.S. fell to a 32-year low in 2018. What is striking about China, though, is how well the country’s bulging working-age population lined up with the period of its fastest growth and how well slowing growth since 2013 has lined up with its decline.
Partly through luck, and partly through good economic decision-making by then paramount leader Deng Xiaoping and his allies, China opened to the world just as its demographic advantage was approaching its apex—not just in comparison to the U.S., but also other developing countries. From 1990 to 2010, China’s working-age populace rose from an already-high 67% of the total population to nearly 75%. The U.S. figure never moved above 67%. All other low-income countries in aggregate maxed out about 62% in that period, according to the U.N.
Over The Hill?Percent of total population between 15 and 64 years old, past and projectedSource: United Nations, CEICNote: Projections from U.N. Population Division's medium fertility scenario.
%U.S.ChinaLess developedregions, excludingChina19902000’10’20’30’40’5055.057.560.062.565.067.570.072.575.077.5
On current demographic trends, however, all of this will reverse by the late 2030s. China will be older than other developing countries and nearly as old as the U.S. China’s rural citizens are already much older on average than city-dwellers. Increasingly, China won’t be able to boost productivity by moving workers from low-value agricultural jobs into high-value manufacturing as it has for decades. And lower savings growth will make state-driven investment surges increasingly untenable. Beijing scrapped China’s decadeslong one-child policy in 2016, but the expected surge of births has failed to materialize.
The nation therefore has a limited window to leverage those big savings to create the next generation of global technological and business champions—before it needs to start supporting legions of elderly with a rapidly shrinking, expensive workforce. From this perspective, China’s inefficient, state-dominated financial system, which continually squanders huge amounts of those savings channeling them to bloated state-owned companies, looks like a potentially fatal problem unless rapidly corrected.
Saving PenniesChinese savings and demographicsSource: CEIC, World Bank (savings rate)*Number of residents aged 0-15 years and over 64 years old, as a percentage of working agepopulation.
%Savings aspercent of grossdomestic productDependencyratio*1990’952000’05’10’1532.535.037.540.042.545.047.550.052.555.0
China’s leadership certainly recognizes that time is limited. Beijing’s state-led innovation programs have a mixed record, though, and are now provoking strong pushback from the U.S.
A better way to ensure success might be to free up the enormous financial resources tied up supporting lumbering state-owned behemoths. The entrepreneurial, ambitious Chinese people can do a far better job with them.